Ronald Samm and Anna Patalong in Scottish Opera's Pagliacci. Scottish Opera 2018. Credit James Glossop..jpg

PAISLEY OPERA HOUSE
SEEDHILL SPORTS GROUND
26th, 28th, 29th July


It will be talked about for a long time to come. On a sports field in Paisley Scottish Opera erected a temporary Opera House: a tent comprised of a series of huge curving, airy shells. An hour before their production of Leoncavello’s “Paglicacci” began, it was buzzing with face painting, a chance to try on costumes, a donkey, games, a raffle for the chance to conduct the William Tell overture, and there were hot dogs, ice cream and a Punch and Judy show. So, no stuffy foyer bar in this Opera House then.

Anna Patalong and Samuel Dale Johnson in Scottish Opera's Pagliacci. Scottish Opera 2018. Credit James Glossop. (2).jpg

And it was standing room only, literally, because this was a promenade performance unlike any other. We the audience circulated around a curtained trailer; as the action moved, so did we. The chorus and dancing villagers turned out to be the man, woman or child standing next to you, and audience participation was unavoidable. It was an absolutely joyous communal experience, with amateur singers and dancers drawn from all sections of the local community who had been trained hard to achieve astonishing, sometimes ravishing results. The surround-sound produced by nearly a hundred voices standing among the audience during the big choruses, was very affecting and unforgettable.

Anna Patalong in Scottish Opera's Pagliacci. Scottish Opera 2018. Credit James Glossop..jpg

The Orchestra of Scottish Opera, looking relaxed in brightly coloured summer dresses – and some even brighter shirts – did not relax their standards one iota under conductor Stuart Stratford, producing a remarkably bright and articulate sound given their canvas backdrop and turf floor. For some of the audience this was a first experience of opera. It was sung in English and the five-strong cast were all excellent in terms of acting as well as singing – not always the case. But being able to stand within a few feet of the outstanding tenor Ronald Samm as he sang the anguished clown Pagliacci’s famous aria “On with the costume”, many were visibly moved, sharing his heartbreak. You don’t feel that effect at the back of the stalls at the Theatre Royal. Nor can you sit almost in touching distance of the stage set for the play within a play, which was revealed when the trailer’s curtains were fully drawn back.

Ronald Samm in Scottish Opera's Pagliacci. Scottish Opera 2018. Credit James Glossop. (4).jpg

It barely mattered, but the plot, basically a simple story of a tragic love triangle among travelling players, was well articulated through brilliant use of all elements of theatre, visual as well as dramatic and musical. Designer Tim Meacock produced a surreal yet comic set, enabling the tragedy and comedy of the story to co-exist until the final explosive scene and the lovers’ deaths. Out of a potential whirlpool of standing and moving bodies Director Bill Bankes-Jones managed to create a remarkably coherent theatrical event in which everyone present had a part to play. For three nights there really was a Paisley Opera House and the people of Paisley made a remarkable happening happen. Opera in a tent? Some opera, some tent.

Mary Thomson

Advertisements